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DWP Pays Aspergers Woman £70000

August 10, 2014

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has been ordered to pay a woman with Asperger’s syndrome a total of £70,000 after an employment tribunal found the DWP to be guilty of disability discrimination.

The tribunal, which was held in Dundee, initially awarded damages to the claimant of £54,000 as ?compensation for constructive unfair ?dismissal and disability discrimination. But in a further hearing, another £17,500 was ordered to be paid by the DWP for not complying ?with a re-employment ruling, the Courier reports.

At a hearing in February of this year, the tribunal heard how the woman was asked to return to work but felt that a breakdown in trust and confidence led to high levels of anxiety which she was unable to overcome.

The DWP was found by the tribunal to have subjected the claimant to harassment due to her Asperger’s. The syndrome, which is a form of autism, shows no outward signs but can cause difficulties in social communication and interaction.

Judge Ian McFatridge said that the DWP “had treated the claimant extremely badly”.

“We required to take into account the fact that the claimant ?is psychologically unable to return to work with the respondents and that this is something which has been brought on by the respondents’ treatment of her,” he said.

A DWP spokesperson said that it acknowledged the tribunal’s findings and it works hard to ensure the department achieves its commitments to good practice in employing and working with disabled people.

Many people with Asperger’s syndrome have a variety of skills that enable them to thrive in a variety of roles. However, they are often disadvantaged when it comes to securing employment because of their difficulties with social skills.

The National Autistic Society says that many employers do not realise that people with some autism spectrum disorders, such as Asperger syndrome, can be highly skilled and qualified as well as being extremely employable.

The charity also believes that employing someone with an autism spectrum disorder demonstrates commitment to equality and diversity, and a positive attitude to disabled people.

Having a diverse workforce brings benefits to staff and business alike, and managers and colleagues often describe working with someone with an autism spectrum disorder as an enriching experience, it says.ADNFCR-1716-ID-801547967-ADNFCR

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10 Comments leave one →
  1. August 10, 2014 4:56 pm

    Hopefully this is the start of the fight back. We may be disabled but we are humans with feelings and rights too

  2. Gary Blake permalink
    August 10, 2014 5:05 pm

    A DWP spokesperson said that it acknowledged the tribunal’s findings and it works hard to ensure the department achieves its commitments to good practice in employing and working with disabled people.

    Whats this no appeal??

    • August 10, 2014 7:02 pm

      don’t worry IDS will come up with something to get round this decision, he will probably change the law again, as usual.

      • Margaret OHagan permalink
        August 10, 2014 8:48 pm

        I was thinking the same, sadly. IDS gets away with everything.

      • August 11, 2014 10:32 pm

        therel be another law pushed through tomorrow to sanction the appeals,they dont acknowledge any wrong doing,even when it hits them in the face.IDIOTS!!!

  3. August 10, 2014 6:15 pm

    Reblogged this on sdbast.

  4. Nigel Biscuit-Barrel Farage permalink
    August 10, 2014 7:53 pm

    What part of Romania is she from?

  5. August 10, 2014 8:34 pm

    Reblogged this on Britain Isn't Eating.

  6. January 23, 2015 8:18 pm

    Reblogged this on lawrencerowntree.

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